Conservation


A Presentation and Discussion on: Ecology and Conservation of Mule Deer in Idaho: Management Strategies for Restoring Populations. The Presentation was by: Dr.Mark Hebblewhite Professor of Ungulate Ecology at the University of Montana.

Photo of a grizzly bear with an elk kill.

The BC Government is requesting comments on their grizzly bear policy, which ends the “trophy hunt” for grizzly bears. According to the policy, licensed hunters will still be able to hunt grizzly bears according to provincial regulations, but edible portions will have to be brought out of the bush and the hunter will not be able to keep the skull, paws or hide. BC’s First Nations will continue to be able to harvest grizzly bears and possess all parts of grizzly bears (including the “trophy parts”) when the harvest is done within traditionally used areas pursuant to Aboriginal or treaty rights (i.e. for food, social, or ceremonial reasons.)

Request for comment and policy documents (be sure to read them).

BCWF Conservation App Promo Image

The BC Wildlife Federation (BCWF) has launched a new app to make it easier for people who witness a threat to the environment to report it immediately to the appropriate agency.

“We’ve been working on this for nearly two years and now we’re ready to make this happen. We’ve given people the ability to report situations in real time and make certain those reports go to the appropriate agency,” said Jesse Zeman, the spokesperson for the BCWF resident priority program, adding that the app allows outdoor enthusiasts with smartphones to take geo-referenced, time staped photos or videos to report issues rlated to the abuse of B.C.’s natural resources.

Read more.

BCWF Conservation App Webpage including some instructions and a map of reports.

The BCWF’s Youth Program is coming to the Dawson Creek Sportsman’s Club this year with the Go Wild! Youth for Conservation Camp from July 10-14, 2017. Themed around conservation and leadership, this weeklong day camp for youth ages 13-17 is a perfect fit for those who enjoy the outdoors and want to gain leadership skills. Go Wild aims to inspire an interest in environmental stewardship and empower youth to take on a leadership role in their communities. Youth will also learn outdoor skills such as fire and shelter building. The cost is $50 + registration fees ($53.60 total).

For more information and to register, please go to: https://www.eventbrite.ca/myevent?eid=34640936975 or search “Go Wild! Youth for Conservation: Dawson Creek 2017” on https://www.eventbrite.ca/

For any questions regarding the camp, please contact Ariene Cabantog and/or Chris Lim.

Contact info: 

Ariene Cabantog – Kids and Youth Program Intern, Go Wild

BC Wildlife Federation

T: 604-882-9988 ext. 228 | E: gowild@bcwf.bc.ca

Chris Lim – Kids and Youth Program Coordinator

BC Wildlife Federation

T: 604-882-9988 ext. 228 | E: youth@bcwf.bc.ca

Also see http://bcwf.net/index.php/programs/gowild

 

Go Wild Dawson Creek 2017 Poster

In preparation for the upcoming provincial general election on May 9, 2017, the BC Wildlife Federation is asking major provincial political parties and individual candidates to answer 5 questions about issues facing fish, wildlife and their habitats.

North Peace Candidate’s Responses

Vote Image May 9

The BC Wildlife Federation and the North Peace Rod and Gun Club will be hosting a town hall meeting at 7 PM on Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at the Fort St. John Curling Rink.

If you are concerned about the future of fish and wildlife populations, and future generation’s ability to hunt, fish, camp, and recreate in British Columbia, you need to attend this meeting. Jim Glaicar, President of the BCWF will provide a provincial perspective, and we will also:

  • Discuss local wildlife and habitat management issues
  • Provide an update on First Nations land agreements
  • Introduce the local candidates for the North Peace riding for the upcoming May 9, 2017 provincial election

Town Hall Fort St. John Poster

BCWF Conservation App Logo

Available to iPhone users, the new Conservation App makes it easy for users to take geo-referenced, time-stamped photos or videos and to report issues related to illegal use, or abuse, of natural resources. The app works both in and out of service areas using the phone’s GPS.  Reports are sent to a secure server and then forwarded automatically to the appropriate enforcement agency. An Android version of the app will be available next year.

Download the app and visit the BCWF mapping website