Government Information


The North Peace Rod and Gun Club will be hosting the BC Backcountry Hunters and Anglers and the Wild Sheep Society of BC for “pint night” to discuss the upcoming proposals for regulation changes for elk, moose, mountain goats and mule deer. Come and join us at 7:30 PM on Thursday, October 24, 2019.

Photo of Moose

Government is reaching out as a reminder regarding their upcoming Public Winter Wildlife Count taking place on February 2nd and 3rd 2019. If you would like to participate, please let Chelsea know what block and date you have chosen.
For those who participated in last year’s count, see the attached 2018 report for your reference with the data you provided. 

If you have already chosen a block, you will be sent an additional satellite image of that specific area.


Please let Chelsea know if you have any questions, and happy counting!  

Ph: 250-787-3560

Chelsea.Sinitsin@gov.bc.ca

Map of Public Wildlife Survey Blocks to Chose From

2018 Public Wildlife Survey Report

Moose Winter Tick Poster 2019

We’re back!

Hello again everyone and welcome to the first email of the 2019 BC Moose Winter Tick Surveillance Program!

We are excited to be getting started again and looking forward to the fifth year of this program. Last year was a great year and we saw a huge increase in participation with almost 500 surveys submitted, check out the latest report on the website. This year we are looking to do even better. We are asking for your help to spread the word about this program and encourage people to document and share their moose observations with us.

(more…)

Topic: Updating the Fort St. John Land Resource Management Plan

Who: Fred Oliemans, Land Use Planning Manager, Northeast

           Genevieve Paterson, Land and Resource Specialist, Northeast

When: Monday, December 3, 2018 7:00 PM

Where: North Peace Rod and Gun Club Clubhouse

Fort St. John LRMP Timeline Image

In October 2018, the Government of British Columbia committed to working with the Blueberry River First Nation and other Treaty 8 First Nations as well as stakeholders to update the Fort St. John LRMP to account for present day land use activities, including impacts on wildlife. Representatives from the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (MFLNRORD) will the at the NPRG Club to discuss the process and how stakeholders can be involved.

 

 

A wildfire near Lower Post has the Alaska Highway Closed from Coal River to the Yukon border.

Map of Lower Post Wildfire August 22, 2018

Although there is no immediate danger, there is some concern about hunters and other recreational users who have trucks and trailers parked at Skook’s Landing. The wildfire people are aware that many  people use this launching site and hopefully protecting vehicles and trailers will be a priority should there be a need.

Please spread the word, especially if you are in contact with anyone who is already up the Kechika/Turnagain or to those who are planning to go in the near future.

Updates can be found at:

BC Wildfire

Drive BC

Photograph of a bull moose

A stratified random block (SRB) aerial survey was conducted in Wildlife Management Unit (WMU) 7-32, southwest of Fort St. John, British Columbia, on the south side of the Peace River. The survey occurred January 2nd through January 7th, 2018. Mike Bridger, regional wildlife biologist, has provided a detailed report of the methods used and results of the survey.

Photo of Mountain Goats

Executive Summary 

Mountain goats are considered to be relatively plentiful within the Peace Region; however, there is a clear need to assess the abundance and distribution of this species in order to implement best management practices. To address these knowledge gaps, a 5-year regional population inventory was initiated in 2013. As part of this multi-year project, an aerial survey of mountain goats was conducted July 18th–22nd, 2017 (Year 4 of 5) in Wildlife Management Units 7-50, 7-51, and 7-54 in the Northern Rockies (Muskwa-Tuchodi area) of the Peace Region, British Columbia. During the survey a total of 821 mountain goats were observed, 623 were adults (males and females combined) and 198 were kids (young-of-the-year). A sightability correction factor of 1.54 (assumes 65% of mountain goats were observed) was applied to the total number of mountain goats counted, resulting in a population estimate of 1,264 individuals within the study area. The information obtained from this aerial survey will be used to delineate population management units and better inform management decisions for mountain goats, including sustainable harvest levels.

Full Report

The Moose Winter Tick Surveillance Program is back!

Cow and calf moose showing signs of tick infestation.

Hello again everyone and welcome to the first email of the 2018 BC Moose Winter Tick Surveillance Program!

The Province of British Columbia is excited to be getting started again and looking forward to seeing results from the 2018 season. Last year was another successful year and we received 330 submissions, check out the latest report on the website. This year we are looking to do even better. We are asking for your help to spread the word about this program and encourage people to document and share their moose observations with us.

(more…)

Photo of a grizzly bear with an elk kill.

The BC Government is requesting comments on their grizzly bear policy, which ends the “trophy hunt” for grizzly bears. According to the policy, licensed hunters will still be able to hunt grizzly bears according to provincial regulations, but edible portions will have to be brought out of the bush and the hunter will not be able to keep the skull, paws or hide. BC’s First Nations will continue to be able to harvest grizzly bears and possess all parts of grizzly bears (including the “trophy parts”) when the harvest is done within traditionally used areas pursuant to Aboriginal or treaty rights (i.e. for food, social, or ceremonial reasons.)

Request for comment and policy documents (be sure to read them).

Feral Hog

A message from the local Fish and Wildlife Branch:

Please be advised that BC Parks Area Supervisor for the Liard Area found a feral swine dead in the bush close to the Liard River Hotspring Provincial Park. The pig appeared to have been killed by a bear.

For your information pigs in the wild are classified as “Schedule C” wildlife. This means that there is no close season and you are within your rights to kill a pig on sight. The rationale behind this is that pigs, in the wild, reproduce quickly and can become entrenched in an ecosystem. They cause damage to the environment and may aid in ecosystem shifts. It would be greatly appreciated if you would help in the initiative to ensure that no pig populations are able to establish themselves in the Northeast. The meat is edible.

If you sight any pigs in the wild, and are able to kill it please do. In all pig sighting cases please contact us to report the details and location of the sighting or kill.

Thank you for your support,

 

Katelyn White

First Nations and Stakeholder Engagement Specialist | Fish and Wildlife Section

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations

Suite 400, 10003-110th Avenue, Fort St. John, BC, V1J 6M7

Ph: 250-787-3496

 

 

Next Page »