Hunting


The deadline for applying for Fall 2017 LEH authorizations is 11:59 PM on May 26, 2017. Do not wait until the last minute! Although the online system is designed to be robust, it’s not worth the chance to be trying to make your applications in the final hours.

The British Columbia government has released the allocation report that covers the next five-year allocation period starting in 2017. Allocation refers to how hunting opportunities for big game animals are split between resident and non-resident hunters. The annual allowable harvest (AAH) is the optimum number of animals that can be harvested annually by hunters from a herd or population which will be replenished through the population’s natural reproduction to meet management objectives and is determined by the government’s regional wildlife managers. The AAH is supposed to be based on current scientific bast practices and current inventory work, but sometimes the inventory work is outdated. The AAH also considers conservation at the forefront and secondly First Nation’s needs for food, social and ceremonial purposes.

The attached document has some explanatory comments and the information can be a little hard to interpret, but one trend is very evident — there are fewer hunting opportunities in the upcoming five-year allocation period.

There are three variables included in the tables that impact the AAH:

First Nation’s Impact: this is determined by different methods around the province and is far from exact science as most First Nations do not report their harvest numbers or composition (cows, calves, bulls etc).

AAH Impact: Is largely based on wildlife inventory work and the impact on allocation depends on whether game populations have increased or declined.

Policy Impact: In February of 2015, Minister of Forests, Lands and Resource Operations, Steve Thomson set the allocation splits between resident and non-resident hunters. The result of the Minister’s decision caused a shift in allocation between residency groups. The splits are contained in the FAQ document.

A detailed breakdown of the allocation impacts for the 2017-2021 allocation five-year period was provided by government in March 2017. (You have to divide the allocation by five to get the annual allocation and hunting opportunities can fluctuate after the first year depending on what the actual harvest data is.) You will notice that for the most part thinhorn sheep in region 6 are not included in the policy (only a couple of management units where resident hunters are on LEH) and that thinhorn sheep in region 7B are totally managed outside of the allocation policy

 

You have likely already received the 2016 Harvest Questionnaire in the mail from the Fish and Wildlife Branch. Please take the time to fill in this questionnaire and mail it in or complete it online. The information provided is important for informing wildlife management.

Game Check

The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Resource Operations (FLNRO) in collaboration with stakeholders has initiated a series of game checks across northeast British Columbia. The game checks are intended to have an educational component, to check for compliance and enforcement (if necessary), to collect samples (i.e. tooth for aging), and to collect information regarding a hunter’s success and observations made during the hunt. All personal information collected during the game checks will be kept confidential and responses to the questions will assist staff in understanding hunter concerns.

A presentation by Christopher Addison, Director of Resource Management, and Mike Bridger, Regional Wildlife Biologist, presented at the Backcountry Sheep Hunting Seminar.

Topics

  1. Population and Harvest Numbers
  2. Stone’s Sheep Management
  3. How can Hunters Help?
  4. Ageing Sheep

BackCountry_Sheep_Seminar_Bridger

Town Hall Meeting

A Large Crowd Hears the BCWF’s Jesse Zeman Speak on Provincial Fish and Wildlife Issues

A crowd of around 300 gun club members and interested public attended our public meeting on local issues including threatened access related to potential transfer of land titles to First Nations as part of a compensation package for Site C. Other issues that were discussed were lack of transparency in government, land disturbances in the Muskwa-Kechika Management Area, and moose management. Jesse Zeman of the BC Wildlife Federation also provided a overview of fish and wildlife issues at the provincial level.

Pat Pimm, our local MLA from the North Peace was in attendance and fielded questions from the crowd and pledged that government was responding to the issues by guarantying access to the backcountry, being more transparent, and developing a provincial moose enhancement strategy. Pat indicated that he has had multiple meetings within government bringing forth our and his concerns. He also said that Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation Rustad was working on a stakeholder consultation strategy that would be area based and everyone including ranchers would be involved.

Mike Bernier, Minister of Education, from Dawson Creek, Katrine Conroy, NDP MLA from Kooetany-West, and Karen Goodings and Brad Sperling from the Peace River Regional District were also in attendance.

Check back for further updates.

Related Information:

Backgrounder

Google Map showing land earmarked by government for First Nations considerations.

Letter to Ministers Thomson and Rustad on the Peace Moberly Tract Regulation Proposal

Crown land quietly offered to First Nations in return for Site C dam site – Mark Hume Globe and Mail

Rod and Gun Club fears Site C land transfers could cut off backcountry access – Jonny Wakefield Alaska Highway News

North Peace Rod and Gun Club to hold forum on governmental hunting regulations – CJDC TV

Bennett admits ‘legitimate criticisms’ of Site C land transfers – Jonny Wakefield Alaska Highway News

Rod & Gun Club to host public forum at Pomeroy hotel – Montana Cummings Energetic City dot CA

North Peace Rod and Gun Club host public forum – Hugh Smith CJDC TV

Gerry Paille’s Presentation Slides

Jesse Zeman’s Presentation Slides

 

 

When: Saturday, March 19, 2016 1:00 PM

Where: North Peace Rod and Gun Club Charlie Lake

Presenter: Chris Addison, Director Resource Operations, FLNRO

The BC Government, along with local First Nations, has been working on a regional moose management plan. Chris Addison will give us an update on the process and outcomes to date.

In April 2016, the Province will introduce a new online system that will improve the overall efficiency of hunter services. Initially the online service will be for Limited Entry Hunting (LEH) applications. In the future, the system will integrate a range of online services for hunters, including licensing.
Hunters will have 24-hour online access to hunting services from any computer with an internet connection and will be able to view and track their Limited Entry Hunting applications online.
To provide access to the new system, hunter numbers will be replaced with a new Fish and Wildlife ID (FWID).
Hunters with an existing hunter number will be assigned a FWID (which will include their old hunter number) and a Resident Hunting Credential. New hunters will need to register and apply for their FWID and Resident Hunting Credential.

What is the Fish and Wildlife ID?
The FWID is a personalized nine-digit identification number that is linked to a secure electronic profile. The electronic profile contains your name, address, date of birth, hunting credential, and other information, such as the status of your LEH applications. The FWID can be printed on paper or displayed on a mobile or other computing device. There is no cost to obtain a FWID.

Hunters who don’t have a computer can still access hunting services – including applying for LEH – through Service BC, FrontCounterBC or a vendor (your local hunting, fishing and sporting goods store).

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