Wildlife


The North Peace Rod and Gun Club will be hosting the BC Backcountry Hunters and Anglers and the Wild Sheep Society of BC for “pint night” to discuss the upcoming proposals for regulation changes for elk, moose, mountain goats and mule deer. Come and join us at 7:30 PM on Thursday, October 24, 2019.

Photo of Moose

Government is reaching out as a reminder regarding their upcoming Public Winter Wildlife Count taking place on February 2nd and 3rd 2019. If you would like to participate, please let Chelsea know what block and date you have chosen.
For those who participated in last year’s count, see the attached 2018 report for your reference with the data you provided. 

If you have already chosen a block, you will be sent an additional satellite image of that specific area.


Please let Chelsea know if you have any questions, and happy counting!  

Ph: 250-787-3560

Chelsea.Sinitsin@gov.bc.ca

Map of Public Wildlife Survey Blocks to Chose From

2018 Public Wildlife Survey Report

Moose Winter Tick Poster 2019

We’re back!

Hello again everyone and welcome to the first email of the 2019 BC Moose Winter Tick Surveillance Program!

We are excited to be getting started again and looking forward to the fifth year of this program. Last year was a great year and we saw a huge increase in participation with almost 500 surveys submitted, check out the latest report on the website. This year we are looking to do even better. We are asking for your help to spread the word about this program and encourage people to document and share their moose observations with us.

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Moose Presentation Poster Image

Thursday, February 21, 2019 7:00 PM at the Lido Theatre

More Information

Topic: Updating the Fort St. John Land Resource Management Plan

Who: Fred Oliemans, Land Use Planning Manager, Northeast

           Genevieve Paterson, Land and Resource Specialist, Northeast

When: Monday, December 3, 2018 7:00 PM

Where: North Peace Rod and Gun Club Clubhouse

Fort St. John LRMP Timeline Image

In October 2018, the Government of British Columbia committed to working with the Blueberry River First Nation and other Treaty 8 First Nations as well as stakeholders to update the Fort St. John LRMP to account for present day land use activities, including impacts on wildlife. Representatives from the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development (MFLNRORD) will the at the NPRG Club to discuss the process and how stakeholders can be involved.

 

 

The next club meeting will be on Monday, October 29, 2018, with guest speaker Mike Bridger. Mike is one of the government biologists based in Fort St. John. Mike will be talking about the results of the summer 2018 mountain goat (and other species) aerial survey and the wolf capture and collaring program he has been working on.Collage Photo of a Mountain Goat in a Cave and of a Wolf About to Be Captured by a Net GunThe meeting time is 7:00 PM at the NPRGC clubhouse.

Photograph of a bull moose

A stratified random block (SRB) aerial survey was conducted in Wildlife Management Unit (WMU) 7-32, southwest of Fort St. John, British Columbia, on the south side of the Peace River. The survey occurred January 2nd through January 7th, 2018. Mike Bridger, regional wildlife biologist, has provided a detailed report of the methods used and results of the survey.

Photo of Mountain Goats

Executive Summary 

Mountain goats are considered to be relatively plentiful within the Peace Region; however, there is a clear need to assess the abundance and distribution of this species in order to implement best management practices. To address these knowledge gaps, a 5-year regional population inventory was initiated in 2013. As part of this multi-year project, an aerial survey of mountain goats was conducted July 18th–22nd, 2017 (Year 4 of 5) in Wildlife Management Units 7-50, 7-51, and 7-54 in the Northern Rockies (Muskwa-Tuchodi area) of the Peace Region, British Columbia. During the survey a total of 821 mountain goats were observed, 623 were adults (males and females combined) and 198 were kids (young-of-the-year). A sightability correction factor of 1.54 (assumes 65% of mountain goats were observed) was applied to the total number of mountain goats counted, resulting in a population estimate of 1,264 individuals within the study area. The information obtained from this aerial survey will be used to delineate population management units and better inform management decisions for mountain goats, including sustainable harvest levels.

Full Report

The Moose Winter Tick Surveillance Program is back!

Cow and calf moose showing signs of tick infestation.

Hello again everyone and welcome to the first email of the 2018 BC Moose Winter Tick Surveillance Program!

The Province of British Columbia is excited to be getting started again and looking forward to seeing results from the 2018 season. Last year was another successful year and we received 330 submissions, check out the latest report on the website. This year we are looking to do even better. We are asking for your help to spread the word about this program and encourage people to document and share their moose observations with us.

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The recent decision by the B.C. government to ban the regulated grizzly hunt to all but Indigenous hunters is a prime example of populism.

The Cambridge Dictionary defines “populism” as: Political ideas and activities that are intended to get the support of ordinary people by giving them what they want.

The ideas are often put forward in the absence of science or analysis of the long-term policy implications.

The threshold for populism is often driven by “popular support” for an idea, not because it is rational, stable or in the best interests of the resource, but because it is politically popular and in the short term will garner political support.

The issue is: Do you want your government to make the popular decision, or the rational decision? The former is driven by the public opinion, the latter by rigorous analysis of the consequences in terms of what is in the best interests of the resource and the populace.

In B.C., 78 per cent of the public, according to the government, is against the hunting of grizzly bears. But a rigorous analysis was conducted by the B.C. Auditor General and the conclusion was that hunting was not seen as a threat to grizzly bear sustainability and was considered a minor factor within the issue of larger habitat management. You can find the 74-page report, An Independent Audit of Grizzly Bear Management, at www.bcauditor.com.

The B.C. government originally made the popular decision that trophy hunting was bad, but stated that hunting for substance was permissible, including for food, social and ceremonial purposes by First Nations. The regulations to manage the trophy hunting through non-retention of bear parts were put to public consultation by the Ministry of Forest Lands Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. From an administrative, technical, compliance and enforcement perspective, government concluded these regulations were unworkable. This was the message received both from inside and outside the government. It really didn’t matter where you sat on the debate; government tried to cut the bear in half, to nobody’s satisfaction.

Prior to a final decision on grizzly bear hunting, government was left with two choices, leave the status quo, or ban all licenced hunting of grizzly bears. Personally, I would not hunt grizzly bears. But if the hunt was sustainable, I would not impose my personal values on others to prevent them from hunting.

Populism won the day and now there is no hunt. First Nations can continue to hunt if they choose. In my view, the larger issue is this constitutionally protected right will be hollow when their fish and wildlife populations are gone. The right to gain economically from commercial uses of natural resources under the UN Declaration of Indigenous Peoples is also in question. First Nations have strong voices and can speak for themselves on how, where and why they want to engage in the grizzly bear debate.

The bottom line is the NDP government and the Green party have chosen a populist view not based on science that does not bode well for future resource management policy decisions.

Alan Martin is director of strategic initiatives at the B.C. Wildlife Federation.

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