Wildlife


Wanted Poster

In 2005, a survey concerning the abundance of porcupines, and a possible decline in numbers, was conducted through Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, BC. At that time, it appeared that porcupine numbers had indeed declined throughout much of the province, although it remained unclear as to whether this decline was similar to that reported as naturally occurring for the species elsewhere in its range.

Ten years has passed since that initial survey, and I am now collecting similar information by which to draw comparisons. With this comparative information in hand, we will have a better understanding of whether the decline has continued, stabilized, or reversed itself. This work is being done as part of my undergraduate degree requirements at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops. The results from this survey also may be incorporated into a scientific paper and/or presentation.

Please help me by completing this voluntary 5-minute survey.

To access the survey, simply click this link https://han29.typeform.com/to/Dh17rm

If that fails to work, you may copy and paste the survey link into the address bar of your Internet browser.

By completing this survey you are giving your consent to the usage of your answers in my graduating project. Your participation will be kept anonymous.

Please report on information only applicable to yourself and only respond to the survey once.

If you know any one else that may have input regarding porcupines, please forward them a copy of this email. I may be contacted at porcupines@tru.ca for more information or a paper copy of the survey. Please also email me if you would like to request a copy of the final report.

Thank you kindly for your time and cooperation.

Hannah Butcher

Fourth Year Natural Resource Science Student,

Thompson Rivers University

This project is being done in conjunction with Dr. Karl Larsen of TRU, the Conservation Data Centre of British Columbia, and the BC Ministry of Environment.

Draft Term of Reference

Draft Terms of References for the F&W Public Advisory Committee Peace Region

Meeting Minutes

PAC Meeting – 12-11-2014

Public Advisory Committee Meeting Summary – April 29th, 2014

Notes from May 31 2013 meeting

Public Advisory Committee minutes Nov 22, 2012

 

This report provides a summary of results from the annual Public Wildlife Count conducted by volunteers in the Peace Region during January 17th and 18th, 2015. This is the eighth year of this project and the results are compared with all (2008-2015) surveys. This project provides useful information for the management of our wildlife resources, and also provides the public with a great opportunity to get involved in wildlife inventory activities and citizen-science in the Peace Region.

The report also provides some information on feeding ungulates.

2015 PUBLIC WILDLIFE COUNT

Victoria Rally Poster

Resident Hunters of British Columbia:

THIS IS THE BIG ONE!

We are planning a rally March 2, 2015 on the steps of the Legislature in Victoria.

This is your opportunity to make it clear to your politicians that you are not supportive of the recently announced Wildlife Allocation Policy.

Each person attending is requested to bring and hand deliver a letter as part of the rally.

We will also have a petition for everyone to sign demanding that Government revisit this policy and change it.

As has been said before ‘THIS IS OUR HILL TO DIE ON!

We NEED this to be the biggest rally seen YET.

Bring your friends, families and anyone who disagrees with selling off our wildlife!

Resident Hunters Rally in Kelowna

Resident Hunters Rally in Kelowna January 31, 2015

The following information comes from Mike Bridger, a biologist from the Fish and Wildlife section in the Fort St. John Office of the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.

The BC Wildlife Health Program is looking for help from wildlife professionals and the public with observations of hair loss caused by “Winter Ticks” on moose throughout the province. The Moose Winter Tick Surveillance Program wants to collect observations to monitor the number of animals with hair loss and the amount of hair loss on each animal to estimate winter tick prevalence and distribution. This program will occur on an annual basis, starting this winter. Winter ticks are a significant parasite for moose populations and can contribute to moose declines in parts of their range, including BC. So, it is an important health factor to monitor, particularly with climate change and alterations to moose habitat. The findings of the surveillance program will contribute to the Provincial Moose Research Program, which was initiated in 2013 to investigate factors influencing moose populations in BC.

Winter tick infestations can be observed on moose during February through April. The ticks spend the entire winter on one moose and there can be as many as 10s of thousands on one individual. As the female ticks become adults they feed on blood in late winter and the irritation causes moose to scratch and groom themselves excessively, resulting in hair loss. The extent of the hair loss is a rough indicator of how many ticks are present and can be observed easily from a distance. We know that tick infestations can result in behavioural changes or direct health impacts that may reduce moose survival.

I hope that you may be interested in contributing to this surveillance program by recording your observations of both healthy and infected moose during the winter and spring.

Keep reading to learn how to participate.

(more…)

Over the past two years, the Organising Committee of the 14th North American Caribou Workshop has been involved in a number of initiatives that highlight the value of caribou to Canadians (and other peoples across the circumpolar distribution of Rangifer), the challenges of conserving caribou, and the research and other activities meant to maintain caribou across arctic, boreal, and mountain landscapes. One of those initiatives is three short videos that explain the ecology and conservation of woodland caribou found in British Columbia (BC). The 14th Caribou Workshop was held in Fort St. John, BC, thus, the focus on the three ecotypes of caribou found in BC (Boreal, Southern Mountain, Northern Mountain).  A series of three videos representing the caribou in each of the three ecotypes have now been released and can be found at:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGa9WHJLRzxs3Xt-dWkB_MA

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