The annual general meeting of the North Peace Rod and Gun Club will be held at 7 PM on Monday, March 26, 2018.

The AGM will include the election of club executive and directors, and a motion to update the club’s constitution as per the new BC Societies Act’s requirements. The current constitution can be downloaded for your review. If you are a club member, and have comments on the constitution for the review committee, please go to the club’s contact page and select “communications” to send those comments in.

 

 

The Moose Winter Tick Surveillance Program is back!

Cow and calf moose showing signs of tick infestation.

Hello again everyone and welcome to the first email of the 2018 BC Moose Winter Tick Surveillance Program!

The Province of British Columbia is excited to be getting started again and looking forward to seeing results from the 2018 season. Last year was another successful year and we received 330 submissions, check out the latest report on the website. This year we are looking to do even better. We are asking for your help to spread the word about this program and encourage people to document and share their moose observations with us.

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Photo of Dad and Infant Hunters

Photo and Story from Outdoor Empire Dot Com

There are a lot of reasons to introduce kids to hunting. It is a wholesome hobby that teaches valuable life lessons, encourages exercise and promotes spending time outdoors. In addition to the reasons that hunting is a good activity for the individual, getting the next generation involved is good for the overall sport.

Read More

The North Peace Rod and Gun Club would like to thank organizers Gregg Nicoll, Guy Lahaye and Tammi Drapeau, and volunteers from the 2276 Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry Royal Canadian Army Cadets for making this day such a great success.

We would also like to thank the event sponsors Royd Lusk (Skyline Wildlife Studios), Apex Valve Service, Angela Britz, Jim and Margaret Little, Matt Loberg and Backcountry.

Photo of Club President Guy Lahaye Awarding Rifles

Club President Guy Lahaye Presents Trophy Certificates and Rifle Awards

February 19, 21, 23 and 24 for Youth and Women only.Poster CORE Course for Youth and Women February 2018

Non-Restricted PAL March 3, 2018

Restricted PAL March 4, 2018

Poster PAL Courses March 2018

NPRGC KIDS OPEN HOUSE
January 27, 2018

The North Peace Rod and Gun Club invites the general public to an open house for kids. Families are invited to bring their kids and have fun.

Kids Fun Events – 1:00 – 3:30pm

Activities for all ages
Food and Drinks provided
(Trap, .22 shoot, digital shooting simulator, tobogganing, bonfire, wiener roast, face painting, smores, etc. weather permitting)

Youth Celebration of Hunting

Youth Celebration of Hunting Contest open to Club Members 18 years of age and under. To enter provide big game species harvested during the 2017 season.

See the following posters for more details and information on how to get trophies measured.

PAL Course: January 20, 2018
PALR Course: January 23, 2018

See the poster for more information.

The recent decision by the B.C. government to ban the regulated grizzly hunt to all but Indigenous hunters is a prime example of populism.

The Cambridge Dictionary defines “populism” as: Political ideas and activities that are intended to get the support of ordinary people by giving them what they want.

The ideas are often put forward in the absence of science or analysis of the long-term policy implications.

The threshold for populism is often driven by “popular support” for an idea, not because it is rational, stable or in the best interests of the resource, but because it is politically popular and in the short term will garner political support.

The issue is: Do you want your government to make the popular decision, or the rational decision? The former is driven by the public opinion, the latter by rigorous analysis of the consequences in terms of what is in the best interests of the resource and the populace.

In B.C., 78 per cent of the public, according to the government, is against the hunting of grizzly bears. But a rigorous analysis was conducted by the B.C. Auditor General and the conclusion was that hunting was not seen as a threat to grizzly bear sustainability and was considered a minor factor within the issue of larger habitat management. You can find the 74-page report, An Independent Audit of Grizzly Bear Management, at www.bcauditor.com.

The B.C. government originally made the popular decision that trophy hunting was bad, but stated that hunting for substance was permissible, including for food, social and ceremonial purposes by First Nations. The regulations to manage the trophy hunting through non-retention of bear parts were put to public consultation by the Ministry of Forest Lands Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development. From an administrative, technical, compliance and enforcement perspective, government concluded these regulations were unworkable. This was the message received both from inside and outside the government. It really didn’t matter where you sat on the debate; government tried to cut the bear in half, to nobody’s satisfaction.

Prior to a final decision on grizzly bear hunting, government was left with two choices, leave the status quo, or ban all licenced hunting of grizzly bears. Personally, I would not hunt grizzly bears. But if the hunt was sustainable, I would not impose my personal values on others to prevent them from hunting.

Populism won the day and now there is no hunt. First Nations can continue to hunt if they choose. In my view, the larger issue is this constitutionally protected right will be hollow when their fish and wildlife populations are gone. The right to gain economically from commercial uses of natural resources under the UN Declaration of Indigenous Peoples is also in question. First Nations have strong voices and can speak for themselves on how, where and why they want to engage in the grizzly bear debate.

The bottom line is the NDP government and the Green party have chosen a populist view not based on science that does not bode well for future resource management policy decisions.

Alan Martin is director of strategic initiatives at the B.C. Wildlife Federation.

Seasonal Greetings from the North Peace Rod and Gun Club

The North Peace Rod and Gun Club will reopen on January 4, 2018 at 10 AM

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